News

IAHS News

27th IUGG Assembly, Montreal Travel Support: IAHS SYSTA & IUGG Grants


The 27th IUGG General Assembly will be held July 8-18, 2019 at the Palais des Congrès in Montréal, Québec, Canada. Abstract submission, online registration and accommodation reservation are now open on the website: http://iugg2019montreal.com/.

The IAHS programme will be over the first half of the Assembly ie 9-14 July 2019.

Financial support is now available as travel grants both:
through the IUGG assembly website http://iugg2019montreal.com/travel-grant.html
and through the IAHS website https://iahs.info/About-IAHS/SYSTA.do


Launched in 2018, IAHS SYSTA awards are available to eligible early career scientists from financially disadvantaged countries attending IAHS events.

The “Sivapalan Young Scientists Travel Award” is named in recognition of the hydrologist M. Sivapalan and based on the following considerations:

  • M. Sivapalan is a world leading scientist who has invigorated the hydrological sciences within IAHS through spearheading the Prediction in Ungauged Basins (PUB) and other initiatives.
  • M. Sivapalan is the perfect role model for young scientists as he has shown to the world how somebody from a financially disadvantaged country can indeed advance to the top.


Applications for an IAHS SYSTA award will be considered from scientists that meet ALL of the following criteria:

  • They grew up and now reside in a financially disadvantaged country
  • They completed their PhD less than 5 years ago (an extra year per child is allowed for parents if they took parental leave)
  • There is evidence of their high quality/high potential as a scientist in the form of a paper of which they are first author in Hydrological Sciences Journal (HSJ) or Proceedings of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences (PIAHS) (or in another listed hydrological journal)
  • They have not previously received a SYSTA award for intercontinental travel.


The award is limited to a maximum of €2000 per individual covering registration fee, visa fee (if necessary), accommodation and transport. Applications can be made in English or French via the IAHS website https://iahs.info/About-IAHS/SYSTA.do .

The deadline for applications for an IAHS SYSTA award for the assembly is Friday 30 November 2018 at 12 noon GMT.

HSJ Special Issue on Hydrological Data: Opportunities and Barriers submission extended

We confirm that the submission deadline for the Hydrological Sciences Journal Special Issue on 'Hydrological Data: Opportunities and Barriers' has been extended to 31st March 2019.


Data issues were, are, and will remain a core component of the hydrological sciences.  Their character and influence on the way the discipline is practiced may vary through time, but their intrinsic role in understanding and managing water resources, as well as in developing sound water policies dictates their continuing importance.  Whereas the primary data issues during much of the twentieth century focused on establishing and maintaining in situ observing networks to provide a sound basis for understanding and predicting the quantity and quality of the resource, both on the surface and in the ground, today’s concern encompasses a much broader suite of problems. 

To elevate and expand the discussion of the critical role of data in all aspects of the hydrological sciences, a Special Issue of the Hydrological Sciences Journal entitled “Hydrological Data: Opportunities and Barriers” is being planned for publication.  Articles are currently being sought on all aspects of data in hydrology; from traditional concerns related to networks to more contemporary thinking about simple, low cost innovations in instrumentation, data management and exchange protocols, and big data, as in large-scale multi-model ensembles spanning long time periods.  Numerous emerging activities and topics provide a substantial source of potential contributions.

We strongly encourage potential authors to contact first the Managing Guest Editor, Christophe Cudennec to inquire about the suitability of their manuscript and about any innovative concept.

Full details of the special issue can be found on the Taylor & Francis website at:

http://explore.tandfonline.com/cfp/est/hydrological-science-data?utm_source=CPB&utm_medium=cms&utm_campaign=JMR05075

 

27th IUGG General Assembly Announcement

"Beyond 100: The next century in Earth and Space Science"

The 27th IUGG General Assembly will be held July 8-18, 2019 at the Palais des Congrès in Montréal, Québec, Canada. This is a special opportunity for participants from around the world to come together and share their science and culture. 2019 marks the 100th anniversary of IUGG; we will look back on the accomplishments of the previous century of Earth and space science research, and forward to the next century of scientific advancement. Join us for a host of scientific activities, including special public lectures, keynote Union lectures and a wide variety of themed sessions.

Abstract submission, online registration and accommodation reservation are all now open on the website: http://iugg2019montreal.com/.

The IAHS programme will be over the first half of the Assembly ie 9-14 July 2019. Details of the IAHS symposia can be found here:

IAHS stand alone symposia - http://iugg2019montreal.com/h.html

Inter-Association symposia:

IAGA, IACS, IAG, IAHS, IAMAS, IAPSO, IASPEI, IAVCEI - http://iugg2019montreal.com/ja.html
IAHS, IAMAS, IAG - http://iugg2019montreal.com/jh.html
IAMAS, IAHS, IACS - http://iugg2019montreal.com/jm.html
IAPSO, IACS, IAGA, IAHS, IAMAS, IAG, IASPEI, IAVCEI -http://iugg2019montreal.com/jp.html
IASPEI, IACS, IAG, IAHS - http://iugg2019montreal.com/js.html

We look forward to welcoming you to Montréal in 2019. Please sign up on the main web page if you would like to receive newsletters and updates for the conference.
 

Quick links:

Program overview and symposia details: http://iugg2019montreal.com/iugg-program.html
Registration and housing reservation: http://iugg2019montreal.com/register.html
Abstract submission: http://iugg2019montreal.com/abstract-submission.html
Submission of a travel grant application http://iugg2019montreal.com/travel-grant.html

For additional information, please contact secretariatiugg2019@jpdl.com

2019 MOXXI, CandHy, WMO HydroHub, and CUAHSI Joint Conference

Innovation in Hydrometry: Overcoming barriers to operationalization

The MOXXI 2019 International Conference will be hosted at New York University (Kimmel Center, 60 Washington Sq. South Suite 605, New York, NY 10012) from March 11th to 13th in collaboration with the Citizen AND Hydrology (CandHy) working group of IAHS, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) HydroHub, and the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science, Inc. (CUAHSI).

The conference aims to bring together different researchers, users, and instrumentation developers to discuss how to overcome the barriers to the advancement of hydrological observations and to the operationalization of innovative hydrometric technologies and monitoring approaches. The event will provide a forum for sharing the latest developments in fields such as sensor technology, information systems, participatory monitoring and consideration of the key challenges faced by those delivering operational hydrometric monitoring services in the public and private sector.

The conference welcomes contributions from practitioners, innovators, data managers and assimilators, as well as researchers in hydrology and other fields. Contributions by experts from National Meteorological and Hydrological Services are particularly welcome.

Further information is available on the IAHS MOXXI page: https://iahs.info/Commissions--W-Groups/Working-Groups/MOXXI/Information/MOXXI-2019.do

IAHS launch new travel award

IAHS are pleased to announce the launch of the new SYSTA Sivapalan Young Scientists Travel Award / Bourse de voyage pour jeunes scientifiques.

SYSTA awards are available to eligible early career scientists attending IAHS events and who grew up and now reside in a financially disadvantaged country. Typically IAHS intends to make around 20 awards per year.

The first IAHS meeting for which SYSTA support is available will be the 27th IUGG Assembly in July 2019 in Montreal, Canada. The deadline for applications for support for the 2019 IUGG Assembly is Tuesday 13 November 2018 at 12 noon GMT.

Applications can be made in English or French.

The award will be limited to a maximum of €2000 per individual covering registration fee, visa fee (if necessary), accommodation and transport.

Full details of the award and the application procedure can be found at https://iahs.info/About-IAHS/SYSTA.do

IAHS signs new Memoranda of Understanding

The International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS) is pleased to announce the signing of Memoranda of Understanding with both The Hydrology Section of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) and The Hydrological Sciences Division of the European Geosciences Union (EGU).

The agreements recognise that a closer relationship between the organisations can foster international exchange in hydrological research and learning and promote international opporunties in hydrology for members.

The organisations will promote the following activities:

- an exchange of information and possible co-organization or reciprocal support to research initiatives and programs;
- an exchange of information and possible co-organization of scientific conferences and workshops;
- an exchange of information and possible joint activities concerning educational opportunities, student programs, and professional services;
- an expansion of membership of both organizations through networking activities and possible joint programs.

Full information is available in the attached memoranda.


IAHS-AGU MOU

IAHS-EGU MOU

These agreements build on the success of the cooperation in southern Africa with WaterNet https://iahs.info/News/News-Archive/2016-News.do?news_id=164

Second Call for Papers - 3rd IAHS Panta Rhei Conference

The 3rd IAHS Panta Rhei Conference will take place in Harare, Zimbabwe from 25-27th October 2018. Abstract submission and registration are now open.

Delegates are invited from the entire global community with interest in sharing experiences on hydrological contribution to societal well-being with particular focus on developing countries. Relevant papers and posters are invited from the entire IAHS community for the conference entitled 'International Conference on Enhanced Hydrological Understanding for a Better Society'.

The Conference has been designed to cover four topical themes – Water secure cities, water-food-energy nexus, adaptive water governance and hydrological uncertainty.

KEY TIMELINES

30 July 2018 First announcement of conference information
21 August 2018 Second announcement of conference information
31 August 2018 Deadline for receiving abstracts
Deadline for receiving registration forms
15 September 2018 Last announcement with detailed conference information
25-26 October 2018 Workshop
27 October 2018 Field trip

Conference Information and Registration Form

STAHY 2018 Spring School

Dear colleagues,

Thank you for your interest in STAHY-2018 in Adelaide Australia.

As noted on the website, we are planning to hold a Spring School in association with the STAHY workshop.

We plan for the Spring School to take place over 2 days, on the campus of the University of Adelaide (in the Adelaide city centre). The following broad themes will be covered:
Day 1 - Model development and calibration in hydrology
Day 2 - Uncertainty estimation in hydrological modelling

The lectures will be delivered in an informal settings to encourage interaction and discussion, and will be delivered by Mark Thyer, David McInerney and Dmitri Kavetski. 

The technical level will best suit research students (Masters and PhDs), as well as industry colleagues interested in research approaches.

In order to better understand person’s availability / level of interest, and help us optimise the schedule, could you please indicate your broad availability using the following Doodle poll https://doodle.com/poll/vb3crc9dtvxakt4k

Note that the Spring School will have a fee of AUD 100 in order to cover the basic running costs. This fee is separate from the STAHY registration fee, which covers the 3 STAHY workshop days (24-26 Sept).

For more information, or to keep up to date with STAHY 2018, visit https://www.stahy2018.org/

Kind regards,
Dmitri Kavetski and Mark Thyer,
on behalf of the local organising committee

Call for Papers - 3rd IAHS Panta Rhei Conference

We are thrilled to invite you to the 3rd IAHS Panta Rhei Conference in Harare, Zimbabwe from 25-27th October 2018. Abstract submission and registration are now open.

Delegates are invited from the entire global community with interest in sharing experiences on hydrological contribution to societal well-being with particular focus on developing countries. Relevant papers and posters are invited from the entire IAHS community for the conference entitled 'International Conference on Enhanced Hydrological Understanding for a Better Society'.

The Conference has been designed to cover four topical themes – Water secure cities, water-food-energy nexus, adaptive water governance and hydrological uncertainty.

KEY TIMELINES

30 July 2018 First announcement of conference information
21 August 2018 Second announcement of conference information
31 August 2018 Deadline for receiving abstracts
Deadline for receiving registration forms
15 September 2018 Last announcement with detailed conference information
25-26 October 2018 Workshop
27 October 2018 Field trip

Conference Information and Registration Form

STAHY 2018 Call For Abstracts

A final friendly reminder that the abstract submission deadline is fast approaching for the STAHY 2018 workshop in Adelaide, Australia, on 24-26 September 2018. Please submit by the deadline, 22 July 2018. All abstracts are welcome and should conform to the required format and be uploaded to the online submission system.

STAHY is an international workshop on statistical hydrology under the auspices of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS).The themes of the workshop are: 

  • Modelling of hydrological and hydro-meteorological events
  • Advances in hydrological forecasting and data series analysis
  • New insights into flood frequency analysis and risk assessment
  • New insights into arid and semi-arid hydrology


We are also pleased to announce a tremendous set of invited speakers:

  • Prof George Kuczera, University of Newcastle, Australia
  • Prof Andras Bardossy, University of Stuttgart, Germany
  • Prof Nagesh Kumar, Indian Institute of Science (IISc), India
  • Prof Neil McIntyre, University of Queensland, Australia
  • Prof Taha Ouarda, National Institute of Scientific Research (INRS), Canada
  • Dr Alan Seed, Australian Bureau of Meteorology, Australia


For more information or to keep up to date with STAHY 2018 please visit https://www.stahy2018.org

We look forward to hearing from you!
 
Best regards,
Dmitri Kavetski on behalf of the local organising committee

Reminder: HSJ Special Issue on “Hydrological Data: Opportunities and Barriers”

Data issues were, are, and will remain a core component of the hydrological sciences. Their character and influence on the way the discipline is practiced may vary through time, but their intrinsic role in understanding and managing water resources, as well as in developing sound water policies dictates their continuing importance. Whereas the primary data issues during much of the twentieth century focused on establishing and maintaining in situ observing networks to provide a sound basis for understanding and predicting the quantity and quality of the resource, both on the surface and in the ground, today’s concern encompasses a much broader suite of problems.

To elevate and expand the discussion of the critical role of data in all aspects of the hydrological sciences, a Special Issue of the Hydrological Sciences Journal entitled “Hydrological Data: Opportunities and Barriers” is being planned for publication. Articles are currently being sought on all aspects of data in hydrology; from traditional concerns related to networks to more contemporary thinking about simple, low cost innovations in instrumentation, data management and exchange protocols, and big data, as in large-scale multi-model ensembles spanning long time periods. Numerous emerging activities and topics provide a substantial source of potential contributions.

For example, the assimilation of data from new observation technologies is an expanding issue which has given rise to activities and efforts within the scientific community, the operational services and the facilitating mechanisms of the United Nations towards measurements and observations in the twenty-first century, innovative water monitoring capabilities and data exchange, virtual labs to facilitate observation-modelling progress; as well as an array of efforts involving citizen science, simple and inexpensive instrumentation, remote sensing innovations, and studies involving the comparative assessment of using a limited number of research basins versus a relatively large number of management basins (e.g., PUB and its ongoing follow ups).

Similarly, data assimilation among various system components in the modeling of hydroclimatology and hydrometeorology, and their interfaces with the land surface, ecological and social systems, and others is moving forward – especially within the framework of the Panta Rhei initiative. Moreover, the emerging focus on the water-food-energy nexus reflects not only the increasing demand for data within each sector, but for viable approaches to their integration that ensure water and food security, sustainable agriculture, and energy production worldwide.

The recent discussions of big data and emerging efforts associated with the shaping of "data science" are crucial concerns for the future of hydrology and should be explored. Also, a number of concerns dealing with retrospective investigations are data-dependent, with particular worries related to data archiving and data rescue.

Moreover, hydrological data are typically obtained through a combination of observations and computational algorithms. For example, river discharge is most often estimated from water level via a rating curve; multi-spectrum analysis of satellite data is frequently combined with multiple information sources to produce a variety of Earth observation products; and observed time-series are used to estimate parameters in complex dynamic hydrological models. As a result, the boundary between observed and computed data is often vague and, considering the degree to which such data are shared, re-used and cited, it can be difficult to trace their provenance.

Notably, a strong and vigorous debate on data could be critical to the development of new policy messages regarding observing networks; i.e., their density, quality, sustainability, investment, modernization, etc. Such a debate may also serve as an important contribution to the development of inputs from the hydrological sciences to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals that, at their core, are data dependent, especially along the observation-knowledge-indicator-target value chain.

The data issue is an increasingly import aspect of the publication industry, where inveterate concerns over open access to data have long vexed the community. The emerging interest in providing datasets as supplementary materials to papers is an encouraging sign, and periodicals like the Hydrological Science Journal take this opportunity to develop and promote such policies for their operations. IAHS could use this Special Issue as a basis for developing new and related portals on iahs.info .

Finally, it is critical that corresponding competencies in hydrology be identified for education and capacity building, particularly with respect to data issues. Numerous organizations are working on these issues and contributions reflecting new efforts in this area are of particular interest.

Guest editors

Managing Guest editor: Christophe Cudennec, Agrocampus Ouest, France & IAHS,  (cudennec@agrocampus-ouest.fr)
Guest editor: Berit Arheimer, SMHI, Sweden
Guest editor: Harry Lins, WMO Commission for Hydrology, USA
Guest editor: Stefan Uhlenbrook, UNESCO World Water Assessment Programme, Italy

Submission

Submission is welcome by 1st November through the Hydrological Sciences Journal online platform

We strongly encourage potential authors to contact first the Managing Guest Editor at cudennec@agrocampus-ouest.fr to inquire about the suitability of their manuscript and about any innovative concept.

Accepted papers will be immediately published along the flow.

IUGG NEWS RELEASE

INTERNATIONAL UNION OF GEODESY AND GEOPHYSICS
UNION GEODESIQUE ET GEOPHYSIQUE INTERNATIONALE

 5 July 2018

Inaugural General Assembly of the International Science Council (ISC)

Paris, 4 July 2018 - In a historic meeting, the International Council for Science (ICSU) and the International Social Science Council (ISSC) merged today to form the International Science Council, a unique global non-governmental scientific organization representing both the natural and social sciences. The meeting opened with addresses from Catherine Brechignac, Secretaire Perpetuel of the French Academy of Sciences. In her speech, Brechignac, who is a former President of ICSU, emphasised that the “natural sciences should no longer dictate the Earth system sciences research agenda, social sciences should be at least as important.” Prince Albert II of Monaco welcomed the participants of the ISC General Assembly in the “Maison des Océans”.

The main item of business for the meeting was the election of a Governing Board to lead the Council. Representatives of the Council’s members elected Daya Reddy, a mathematician from South Africa, to be the first President. Peter Gluckman, the former Chief Science Adviser to the Prime Minister of New Zealand, became the President-elect, and will assume the Presidency a the next General Assembly in 2021. The further officers of the Board are Elisa Reis (Brazil) Vice President, Jinghai Li (China: CAST) Vice President, Alik Ismail-Zadeh (Russia/Germany) Secretary, and Renée van Kessel (The Netherlands) Treasurer.

The ordinary members of the Board will be Geoffrey Boulton (UK), Melody Burkins (USA), Saths Cooper (South Africa), Anna Davies (Ireland), Pearl Dykstra (The Netherlands), Sirimali Fernando (Sri Lanka), Ruth Fincher (Australia), James C. Liao (China: Academia Sinica in Taipei), Natalia Tarasova (Russia), and Martin Visbeck (Germany). In his acceptance speech, the incoming president, Daya Reddy, spoke about the importance of inclusiveness, of involving all regions of the world in the work of the new Council. He called for the involvement of early career scientists in partnerships and agenda setting. “We have set ourselves an ambitious goal to be a powerful, visible, credible voice for science. There’s no time to waste. Let’s get to work!”

Participants were also able to vote for the location of the next General Assembly of the Council, choosing between two bids, one from Montreal, Canada, one from Oman. The bid by the city of Muscat, Oman, carried the vote and it will host the 2nd General Assembly in 2021.

(source: ISC Press Release)

STAHY 2018 Call For Abstracts and Registration

A friendly reminder to submit your abstract for STAHY 2018, the submission deadline has been extended until 22 July 2018. We look forward to seeing you in Adelaide, South Australia from 24-26 September 2018.

All abstracts are welcome and should conform to the required format and be uploaded to the online submission system.

Registration is also now open, the portal and information are available here. The Early Bird Registration deadline is 31 July 2018.

For more information or to keep up to date with STAHY 2018 visit https://www.stahy2018.org/

Best Regards,
The local organising committee

CALL FOR APPLICANTS — IAHS Early Career Committee

Early Career scientists make up a significant amount of our community, creating an opportunity to include a new generation of hydrologists as active contributors to IAHS. 

During its Bureau Meeting in July 2017 IAHS decided to strengthen its Early Career scientist representation to enable more active participation of those members within IAHS Commissions and Working Groups. To achieve this goal IAHS will establish an Early Career Committee (ECC) consisting of the Early Career Representative of each IAHS Commission plus a chair and co-chair. The IAHS definition of Early Career embraces scientists up to 5 years after completion of the PhD (allowing for an extra year per child for parents if they took parental leave).

More information on the Early Career Committee is available on the IAHS website -  https://iahs.info/About-IAHS/Early-Career-Committee-.do

If you are interested in becoming an Early Career Scientist Representative for one of the IAHS Commissions, you can apply by completing the form by 15 August 2018. The ECC embraces equal opportunity for all its members, and strives to have a diverse composition in terms of gender and geography.

Please don’t hesitate to contact us if you have any questions.

Nilay Dogulu (ndogulu@metu.edu.tr)
Tim van Emmerik (thm.vanemmerik@gmail.com)

First WMO HydroHub Innovation Call - Innovation for Operational Hydrology

The WMO HydroHub is looking for innovative solutions in operational hydrology. Apply to the Innovation Call to make a difference on the ground! Deadline: 20 August 2018

100.000 CHF seed-funding will be provided to sustainable solutions that can be up-scaled around the world.
 
Apply now

Applications to this call must address the following issues:

- Focus on freshwater quantity observation, namely water levels, river discharge, soil moisture and precipitation;
- Innovative observation technologies or monitoring approaches that could be adopted by National Meteorological and Hydrological Services (NMHSs);
- Reduced total cost of ownership, i.e. comprising both direct and indirect costs (such as operations, maintenance, personnel training);
- Especially fit for Least-Developed Countries (LDC) and Small Island Developing States (SIDS);
- Maximizing impact on the ground through the creation of local income from sales and services generated by the awarded solution.

More information is available on the following webpage: http://hydrohub.wmo.int/en/news/first-wmo-hydrohub-innovation-call

8th International Water Resources Management Conference of ICWRS PIAHS Volume 379 available online

The 8th International Water Resources Management Conference Beijing, China, 13–15 June 2018 Innovative Water Resources Management in a Changing Environment – Understanding and Balancing Interactions between Humankind and Nature papers are all available open access as PIAHS Volume 379.

During the past hundreds of years, various kinds of water resources systems have been developed to support efficient uses of water resources for humankinds worldwide. Such kinds of systems were mainly used to provide humankind with clean water for irrigation, industry and domestic uses. The history of water resources systems is part of the history of humankind itself. The development of water resources systems needs a careful analysis on water demands and environmental impact. Unfortunately, consideration on the water

needs for nature is not enough for many water resources systems. This fact has resulted in the deterioration of water quality and even degradation of ecosystem in many river basins. Due to the rapid development of economics and society worldwide, present challenges for water resources systems are mostly unprecedented. A new effort to devise innovative technologies and solutions for present water problems should be paid much attention by research community including IAHS. These challenges for water resources systems highlight that the adaptation to the changing environment is an essential field of research, which is also involved in the

Panta Rhei Scientific Decade (2013–2022) of IAHS. Efficient adaptation requires gaining a forward vision on future water demands and water availability. A deep understanding of the two-way interaction between nature and humankinds is needed to develop such vision.

The symposium included the following themes:
– Water resources management under changing environment
– Socio-hydrology as the basis of water resources management
– Assessment of available water resources at regional and basin scales

Conference website http://iwrm2018.bnu.edu.cn/

 

IAHS 2017 Scientific Assembly PIAHS Volumes now available

The IAHS is pleased to announce that the three volumes of Proceedings of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences from the July 2017 IAHS Scientific Assembly in Port Elizabeth, South Africa are all now available online open access.

Volume 378 
Understanding spatio-temporal variability of water resources and the implications for IWRM in semi-arid eastern and southern Africa.
Editors: H. Makurira, D. Mazvimavi, J.-M. Kileshye-Onema, E. Kapangaziwiri, and W. Gumindoga

This volume contains 14 peer-reviewed papers that focus on integrated water resources management in the southern Africa region and are a culmination of extensive research in five broad themes, namely, (1) hydrological modelling (2) groundwater hydrology (3) application of earth observations in water resources assessments (4) water allocation and use and (5) water quality management. Southern Africa offers wide research opportunities to solve challenges related to the assessment of surface and groundwater resources, water supply and sanitation, water pollution and allocation. However, data scarcity and difficulty in accessing research sites discourage many research efforts. The papers in this Volume are research outputs from mainly postgraduate studies conducted at universities in southern Africa with the sole aim of contributing to knowledge in water sciences that will facilitate informed decision-making and policy formulation by water managers and practitioners in the region.

Volume 377
Water quality and sediment transport issues in surface water.
Editors: G. Mahe, K. Heal, A. B. Gupta, and H. Aksoy

Sediment transport and water quality are modified by human activities all along river courses. If research focuses only on pristine basins and large dams, little is known about the quality of the waters flowing to the sea. Most rivers around the world are regulated to some extent by hydraulic infrastructure, even in developing countries. How river management impacts on water quality and sediment transport from the upper basins to coastal areas is not well known in many countries, especially in the developing world, even though this may have strong and long lasting effects on coastal geomorphology and ecosystems. In a time where many people try to explain the coastal recession that is observed on many coastlines, from the sea level rise and thus from “global change”, knowledge of the actual sediment transport to the sea could bring new perspectives, as the reduction of riverine sediment transfer certainly contributes to this recession. One of the associated questions is what is the role of the human impact on these processes? At what speed do these changes take place? This proceeding volume gathers together communications about water quality and sediment transport monitoring and modeling, especially for large river basins, with a focus on the relationships between estuarine river systems and coastal areas in terms of water quality and sediment load. There are also studies presenting diverse methods for estimating the amount of sediment released to the sea and its variability in time.

Volume 376
Water security and the food–water–energy nexus: drivers, responses and feedbacks at local to global scales.
Editor(s): G. Jewitt and B. Croke

The papers presented in this special issue were part of a symposium held during the IAHS Scientific Assembly in Port Elizabeth, South Africa, in July 2017. Contributions were invited that investigated the issue of water security and more broadly the food-water-energy nexus; including investigation of water quality as well as quantity, hydro-economics, education, transboundary issues, the influence of processes operating at local to global scales, as well as those that compared conclusions drawn from local and global studies. The papers presented in this special issue cover a wide range of topics, and have a broad geographical focus.

STAHY 2018 Call For Abstracts

We are thrilled to invite you to the STAHY 2018 conference in Adelaide, Australia. Abstract registration is now open.
 
The International Commission on Statistical Hydrology (ICSH) of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS) invites researchers to submit abstracts for presentation at the ninth edition of the STAHY International Workshop, STAHY 2018. STAHY 2018 will bring together the experts – academics and practitioners – and young scientists alike for vibrant scientific discussions and debates. STAHY 2018 will be held in Adelaide, South Australia from 24-26 September 2018.
 
Please note that all abstracts are welcome and should conform to the required format and be uploaded to the online submission system.
 
STAHY 2018 will focus on statistical methods for hydrological applications. The themes of the workshop are:

  • Modelling of hydrological and hydro-meteorological events
  • Advances in hydrological forecasting and data series analysis
  • New insights into flood frequency analysis and risk assessment
  • New insights into arid and semi-arid hydrology


STAHY 2018 will also celebrate the contributions of Prof George Kuczera, a stalwart of the Australian and international hydrological communities. George has made tremendous contributions to hydrological research and practice over the last 40 years, and this workshop will provide an opportunity for all of us to celebrate these achievements.
 
Important dates
Abstract Submission Deadline 01 July 2018
Early Bird Registration Deadline 31 July 2018
Registration Deadline 31 August 2018
Conference Date 24-26 September 2018

Venue
The workshop will be held in the Beachside Function Centre of the Glenelg Pier hotel, which is located on the Glenelg foreshore and offers stunning ocean views.

The Glenelg Pier Hotel
18 Holdfast Promenade
Glenelg SA 5045
 
Registration will be opening soon, information available here. For more information or to keep up to date with STAHY 2018 visit https://www.stahy2018.org/
 
We look forward to receiving your abstracts and seeing you in Adelaide.

Best Regards,
The local organising committee

Updates to our privacy notice

We at the International Association of Hydrological Sciences take great care to protect your privacy. The new General Data Protection Regulation ("GDPR") which comes into effect on Friday 25th May 2018 changes the way organisations can use your data.

We are fully committed to keeping your information private. We have updated our privacy policy and invite you to take a look (https://iahs.info/About-IAHS/Data-Protection-Privacy-Policy/).

In summary, we do not share your personal details with third parties with the exception of Samui, the managers of the iahs.info website and Taylor & Francis to facilitate the access to HSJ online where required, and they have an obligation to IAHS to only use the data for the purpose for which it was transferred. The IAHS does not collect your financial information as membership is currently free. Payments for publications and subscriptions are processed by PayPal or credit card and your details are not stored or retained.

If you want to continue receiving messages from us, you don't need to do anything. If you want to stop receiving some or all of our messages, please follow the instructions below.

Click here (https://iahs.info/ezines/unsubscribe.do) to unsubscribe from all of the email distribution lists.

To have all your membership information permanently deleted email info@iahs.co.uk.

Thank you

Claire Lupton
IAHS Executive Secretary

2018 Summer Schools

Dear IAHS members

Please find below two announcements of Summer Schools.

The Summer School on Runoff Predictions in Ungauged Basins will run at the TU Wien, Austria from July 1-6, 2018. The purpose of the Summer School is to learn methods for estimating runoff characteristics in the absence of local runoff observations.

http://www.waterresources.at/fileadmin/user_uploads/News_items/PUB_2018_Flyer.pdf


The 9th Annual Catchment Science Summer School will run at the University of Birmingham UK from Aug 26-31, 2018. The course is designed for PhD students and Post Docs in catchment science.

https://www.usask.ca/watershed/teaching/catchment-science-summer-school.php


Please forward to potentially interested people.


Best wishes

Günter Blöschl
IAHS President

2018 International Hydrology Prize medalists and Tison award ceremony

Congratulations to the recipients of the International Hydrology Prize (Dooge medal and Volker medal) and Tison award for 2018!

Left to right: Christophe Cudennec (Secretary General IAHS), Johannes Cullmann (Director, Climate and Water Department WMO), Howard Wheater (Dooge Medal Recipient), Andreas Schumann (Volker Medal Recipient), Ryan T. Bailey (Tison Award Recipient), Abou Amani (Chief of Section HSS, UNESCO), Günter Blöschl (President IAHS).


The International Hydrology Prize is awarded annually by IAHS, with UNESCO and WMO, to two people who have made an outstanding contribution to hydrological science. The 2018 IHP medals were awarded during the WMO Conference for Prosperity through Hydrological Services (HydroConference) as follows:

IHP Dooge Medal: Howard Wheater (Canada)
"In recognition of his international leadership in hydrological research of scientific excellence, coupled with its translation into policy and practice and application worldwide.” For the full citation and response see the IAHS webpage https://iahs.info/About-IAHS/Competition--Events/International-Hydrology-Prize/International-Hydrology-Prize-Winners/H.Wheater.do

IHP Volker medal:  Andreas Schumann (Germany)
“For pioneering contributions to water resources research for the benefit of society”. For the full citation and response see the IAHS webpage https://iahs.info/About-IAHS/Competition--Events/International-Hydrology-Prize/International-Hydrology-Prize-Winners/A.Schumann.do

The Tison award was presented to Ryan Bailey and is shared by Ryan T. Bailey (USA) & Saman Tavakoli Kivi (Iran) for the paper:

Ryan T. Bailey & Saman Tavakoli Kivi (2017) Method for estimating available groundwater volume of small coral islands, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 62:14, 2381-2392, DOI: 10.1080/02626667.2017.1382703

The IAHS Tison Award, established in 1982, aims to promote excellence in research by young hydrologists. The Award is granted for an outstanding paper published by IAHS in a period of two years previous to the deadline for nominations.

For the full citation and response see the IAHS web page: https://iahs.info/About-IAHS/Competition--Events/Tison-Award/Tison-Award-winners/Bailey--Tavakoli-Kivi/
The paper is available open access.

First two 2017 IAHS Scientific Assembly PIAHS volumes now available online

The first two volumes of proceedings from the IAHS 2017 Scientific Assembly are now available online open access as PIAHS volumes 376 and 377


Volume 377, 2018 Water quality and sediment transport issues in surface water
IAHS Scientific Assembly 2017, Port Elizabeth, South Africa, 10–14 July 2017
Editors: G. Mahe, K. Heal, A. B. Gupta, and H. Aksoy

Volume 376, 2018 Water security and the food–water–energy nexus: drivers, responses and feedbacks at local to global scales
IAHS Scientific Assembly 2017, Port Elizabeth, South Africa, 10–14 July 2017
Editors: G. Jewitt and B. Croke

The articles are available for download and printed versions of the volumes are available from Copernicus.

IUGG annual report

The IUGG Annual Report 2017 is now available at http://www.iugg.org/publications/reports/report2017.pdf   It provides a summary of the activities of the Union, its Associations, Commissions and Programs. IUGG thanks all who contributed to the report.

8th Global FRIEND-Water Conference Abstract deadline extended to 30 April

The 8th Global FRIEND-Water Conference will focus on the theme of hydrological processes and water security in a changing world, under which eight sessions will cover the topics including:

  • Hydrological observations under the changing environment and scarcity
  • River regimes and hydrological extremes under the changing environment
  • Simulation and prediction of surface water and groundwater processes under the impact of human activities
  • Urban hydrology and sponge city
  • Multi-objective water resources allocation and operation
  • Integrated watershed management including eco-hydrology and socio-hydrology
  • Water quality and sediment transport including coastal hydrology: changes under climate change and human activities
  • River health and ecological baseflow under changing environment

A post conference technical tour will be arranged to visit water related projects and facilities of Beijing.

The key dates are now as follows:
Abstract submission deadline: April 30, 2018
Notification of acceptance (oral or posters) and invitation issue date: May 15, 2018
Full paper/Extended Abstract submission deadline: July 30, 2018

Full information is available at http://8thfriendwater.iwhr.org/40?lang=en

Report from Vienna Catchment Science Symposium, Saturday 14th April, 2018

On the Theme of: 23 unsolved problems in Hydrology that would revolutionise research in the 21st century

Report
We had excellent meetings on Friday 13 April 2018 (Splinter meeting at EGU in Vienna) and on Saturday 14 April (Vienna Catchment Symposium at TU Wien) with about 60 and 110 people attending, respectively.

These are the questions resulting from the LinkedIn discussion, the Friday Splinter meeting and additional email contributions received before Friday.
https://iahs.info/uploads/Unsolved%20Problems%20in%20Hydrology/Questions_13_April_2018_edited1613.pdf

On Saturday we had three rounds of discussions in four break out groups and one final plenary discussion. In each round we discussed the questions, merged them, split them and reworded them as needed followed by a voting on prioritising the questions. The voting was for gold/silver/bronze/remove in each of the three break out group rounds. Only the gold and silver ones were retained for the plenary with an additional round of voting (by the entire plenary) for gold, silver or removing them from the list. The idea of the process was to whittle down the 260 questions initially proposed to a more coherent and smaller set of those questions deemed most important by the participants. The process resulted in 16 gold and 29 silver questions which are posted here.
https://iahs.info/uploads/Unsolved%20Problems%20in%20Hydrology/Questions_14_April_2018_plenary.pdf

A paper drafting team (Günter Blöschl, Elena Toth, Jeff McDonnell, Gia Destouni, Antonio Chambel, Elena Volpi, Jim Kirchner, Marc Bierkens, Christine Stumpp, Christophe Cudennec, Hubert Savenije, Siva Sivapalan, Aldo Fiori) has been formed to
- check whether there are any obvious ‘holes’ in the list and propose a small number of additional questions if needed
- wordsmith the questions
- start with an initial draft of the summary paper.

The updated list of questions will be circulated among the co-authors (those who have substantially contributed to the process which will be around 160 scientists) with a final voting on the list, and the co-authors will also be asked to provide suggestions for any changes to the paper draft.

The plan is to submit the paper to HSJ.

Many thanks again for all your contributions

Günter

HSJ Special Issue on “Hydrological Data: Opportunities and Barriers”

Data issues were, are, and will remain a core component of the hydrological sciences.  Their character and influence on the way the discipline is practiced may vary through time, but their intrinsic role in understanding and managing water resources, as well as in developing sound water policies dictates their continuing importance.  Whereas the primary data issues during much of the twentieth century focused on establishing and maintaining in situ observing networks to provide a sound basis for understanding and predicting the quantity and quality of the resource, both on the surface and in the ground, today’s concern encompasses a much broader suite of problems. 

To elevate and expand the discussion of the critical role of data in all aspects of the hydrological sciences, a Special Issue of the Hydrological Sciences Journal entitled “Hydrological Data: Opportunities and Barriers” is being planned for publication.  Articles are currently being sought on all aspects of data in hydrology; from traditional concerns related to networks to more contemporary thinking about simple, low cost innovations in instrumentation, data management and exchange protocols, and big data, as in large-scale multi-model ensembles spanning long time periods.  Numerous emerging activities and topics provide a substantial source of potential contributions.

For example, the assimilation of data from new observation technologies is an expanding issue which has given rise to activities and efforts within the scientific community, the operational services and the facilitating mechanisms of the United Nations towards measurements and observations in the twenty-first century, innovative water monitoring capabilities and data exchange, virtual labs to facilitate observation-modelling progress; as well as an array of efforts involving citizen science, simple and inexpensive instrumentation, remote sensing innovations, and studies involving the comparative assessment of using a limited number of research basins versus a relatively large number of management basins (e.g., PUB and its ongoing follow ups). 

Similarly, data assimilation among various system components in the modeling of hydroclimatology and hydrometeorology, and their interfaces with the land surface, ecological and social systems, and others is moving forward – especially within the framework of the Panta Rhei initiative.  Moreover, the emerging focus on the water-food-energy nexus reflects not only the increasing demand for data within each sector, but for viable approaches to their integration that ensure water and food security, sustainable agriculture, and energy production worldwide. 

The recent discussions of big data and emerging efforts associated with the shaping of "data science" are crucial concerns for the future of hydrology and should be explored.  Also, a number of concerns dealing with retrospective investigations are data-dependent, with particular worries related to data archiving and data rescue. 

Moreover, hydrological data are typically obtained through a combination of observations and computational algorithms.  For example, river discharge is most often estimated from water level via a rating curve; multi-spectrum analysis of satellite data is frequently combined with multiple information sources to produce a variety of Earth observation products; and observed time-series are used to estimate parameters in complex dynamic hydrological models.  As a result, the boundary between observed and computed data is often vague and, considering the degree to which such data are shared, re-used and cited, it can be difficult to trace their provenance.  

Notably, a strong and vigorous debate on data could be critical to the development of new policy messages regarding observing networks; i.e., their density, quality, sustainability, investment, modernization, etc.  Such a debate may also serve as an important contribution to the development of inputs from the hydrological sciences to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals that, at their core, are data dependent, especially along the observation-knowledge-indicator-target value chain.

The data issue is an increasingly import aspect of the publication industry, where inveterate concerns over open access to data have long vexed the community.  The emerging interest in providing datasets as supplementary materials to papers is an encouraging sign, and periodicals like the Hydrological Science Journal take this opportunity to develop and promote such policies for their operations.  IAHS could use this Special Issue as a basis for developing new and related portals on iahs.info .

Finally, it is critical that corresponding competencies in hydrology be identified for education and capacity building, particularly with respect to data issues. Numerous organizations are working on these issues and contributions reflecting new efforts in this area are of particular interest.

Guest editors

Christophe Cudennec (Agrocampus Ouest, France & IAHS, Managing Guest editor), Berit Arheimer (SMHI, Sweden), Harry Lins (WMO Commission for Hydrology, USA), Stefan Uhlenbrook (UNESCO World Water Assessment Programme, Italy)

Submission

Submission is welcome by 1st November through the Hydrological Sciences Journal online platform https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/thsj20/current

We strongly encourage potential authors to contact first the Managing Guest Editor at cudennec@agrocampus-ouest.fr to inquire about the suitability of their manuscript and about any innovative concept.

Accepted papers will be immediately published along the flow.

23 Unsolved Problems in Hydrology - Update

In November 2017 IAHS launched an initiative to generate the 23 unsolved problems in Hydrology that would revolutionise research in the 21st century with a YouTube video. We have since been gathering a list of questions and discussion through the IAHS LinkedIn Group https://www.linkedin.com/groups/13552921 .

The list will be discussed during the Splinter meeting on Friday, 13th April 2018 at EGU in Vienna and further discussed and finalised at the 2018 Vienna Catchment Science Symposium - "23 unsolved problems in Hydrology that would revolutionise research in the 21st century", on Saturday, 14th April, at Vienna University of Technology http://www.waterresources.at/fileadmin/user_uploads/News_items/VCSS_Programme_2018_v4.pdf .

The forum welcomes inputs and discussions until next Thursday, 12th April before the meetings in Vienna on Friday and Saturday.

International Conference on Natural Hazards and Risks in a Changing World

Dear colleagues,

The registration for the "International Conference on Natural Hazards and Risks in a Changing World" is now open! The conference will be held at the University of Potsdam (Campus Griebnitzsee) in Potsdam, Germany, from 4-5 October 2018.

The purpose of this conference is to bring together researchers from natural sciences (e.g. hydrology, meteorology, geomorphology, hydraulic engineering, environmental science, seismology, geography), risk research, nonlinear systems dynamics, and applied mathematics to discuss new insights and developments about data science, changing systems, multi-hazard events and the linkage between hazard and vulnerabilities under unstable environmental conditions. Knowledge transfer, communication and networking will be key issues of the conference. The conference will be organized by means of invited talks given by outstanding experts, oral presentations, poster sessions and discussions.

Already confirmed speakers are:
1) Prof. Dr. Matthias Holschneider (University of Potsdam, Institute of Mathematics): Data Science
2) Prof. Dr. Hans Joachim Schellnhuber (Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) Potsdam): Changing Systems
3) Prof. Dr. Jakob Rhyner (United Nations University, Institute for Environment and Human Security): Cascade and Multi-Hazard
4) Prof. Dr. Jeroen Aerts (VU Amsterdam, Institute for Environmental Studies): Linking Hazard and Vulnerability

Please submit your abstract of 300-500 words, including title, author‘s name, and affiliation until 15th May 2018 via the link: http://www.j-work.de/up/nathazardsrisk/
Letters of acceptance/rejection will be send to the corresponding author before 15th June 2018. Registration can be done until 4th September 2018 via the link: http://www.j-work.de/up/nathazardsrisk/
For organizational reasons, attendance is limited in number.

We are happy to announce that the German Committee for Disaster Reduction (DKKV) will award the Young Professionals Award “Preparedness 2030“ at the conference. DKKV wants to highlight and promote outstanding theses in any field consistent with disaster reduction. The call for contributions and further information can be found at www.dkkv.org . The application deadline for the “Preparedness 2030“ Award is 1st of August 2018.

More details about the conference can be found in the attached flyer.
We are looking forward to welcoming you in Potsdam!
Kind regards,
Theresia Petrow

International Decade for Action Water for Sustainable Development 2018-2028

On World Water Day, http://worldwaterday.org/, 22 March 2018, the 'International Decade for Action: Water for Sustainable Development 2018-2028' is launched by the United Nations in New York.  https://www.un.org/pga/72/event-latest/launch-of-the-international-decade-of-water-for-sustainable-development-2018-2028/

IAHS is member of the Task Force set up by UN Water to facilitate the planning and organisation of the Decade. http://www.wateractiondecade.org/

'In December 2016, the United Nations General Assembly unanimously adopted the resolution “International Decade (2018–2028) for Action – Water for Sustainable Development” to help put a greater focus on water during ten years.

Emphasizing that water is critical for sustainable development and the eradication of poverty and hunger, UN Member States expressed deep concern over the lack of access to safe drinking water, sanitation and hygiene and over water related disasters, scarcity and pollution being exacerbated by urbanization, population growth, desertification, drought and climate change. The new Decade will focus on the sustainable development and integrated management of water resources for the achievement of social, economic and environmental objectives and on the implementation and promotion of related programmes and projects, as well as on the furtherance of cooperation and partnership at all levels in order to help to achieve internationally agreed water-related goals and targets, including those contained in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

In the resolution, UN Member States invited the Secretary-General, with the support of UN-Water, to take appropriate steps, within existing resources, to plan and organize the activities of the Decade at the global, regional and country levels.

The Decade will commence on World Water Day 22 March 2018, and terminate on World Water Day, 22 March 2028.'

(Source:http://www.unwater.org/new-decade-water/ )

2018 UN World Water Development Report, Nature-based Solutions for Water

The World Water Development Report was presented at the 8th World Water Forum, in Brasilia, Brazil on the 19th of March 2018. IAHS contributed to the report as an official partner of UN Water.


The WWDR2018, Nature-based solutions for water, demonstrates how nature-based solutions (NBS) offer a vital means of moving beyond business-as-usual to address many of the world’s water challenges while simultaneously delivering additional benefits vital to all aspects of sustainable development.

Currently, water management remains heavily dominated by traditional, human-built (i.e. ‘grey’) infrastructure and the enormous potential for NBS remains under-utilized. NBS include green infrastructure that can substitute, augment or work in parallel with grey infrastructure in a cost-effective manner. The goal is to find the most appropriate blend of green and grey investments to maximize benefits and system efficiency while minimizing costs and trade-offs.

NBS for water are central to achieving the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development because they also generate social, economic and environmental co-benefits, including human health and livelihoods, food and energy security, sustainable economic growth, decent jobs, ecosystem rehabilitation and maintenance, and biodiversity. Although NBS are not a panacea, they will play an essential role towards the circular economy and in building a more equitable future for all.

Working with nature improves the management of water resources, helps achieve water security for all, and supports the core aspects of sustainable development.

The full version of the report and presentation can be found at:
http://www.unesco.org/new/en/natural-sciences/environment/water/wwap/wwdr/2018-nature-based-solutions/

IAHS Announce the winner of the 2018 Tison Award

The Secretary General of IAHS is pleased to announce that the jury of the IAHS Tison award for young hydrologists have identified the 2018 winning paper as:

Ryan T. Bailey & Saman Tavakoli Kivi (2017) Method for estimating available groundwater volume of small coral islands, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 62:14, 2381-2392, DOI: 10.1080/02626667.2017.1382703

This award is prestigious with a 1000 US$ prize and a 1 year subscription to HSJ sponsored by Taylor & Francis the publisher of Hydrological Sciences Journal.

Our congratulations go to both authors.

The award ceremony, together with the 2 medals of the IAHS-UNESCO-WMO International Hydrology Prize, will be held on 8 May during the WMO Global Conference "Prosperity through hydrological services", http://hydroconference.wmo.int/en/conf  at the WMO Headquarters, Geneva.
 

 
The paper is free to view on Taylor & Francis online - 10.1080/02626667.2017.1382703

The IAHS Tison Award, established in 1982, aims to promote excellence in research by young hydrologists. The Award is granted for an outstanding paper published by IAHS in a period of two years previous to the deadline for nominations. The description of the award is available at https://iahs.info/About-IAHS/Competition--Events/Tison-Award.do

Registration and abstract submission now open for ICCE symposium 2018

Dear colleagues,

Registration and abstract submission for the ICCE Symposium are now open.  Entitled "Climate Change Impacts on Sediment Dynamics: Measurement, Modelling and Management" the symposium will take place from 27 to 31 August 2018 in Moscow, Russia.

The symposium will focus on:
- Climate change and human impacts as a drivers of erosion, sediment dynamics, and river morphology transformation;
- The influence of climate change on water quality and drinking water treatment and supply;
- Erosion and sediment transport models and river basin management tools.

The ICCE Symposium will be accompanied by The Second International Young Scientists Forum on Soil and Water Conservation which will address mechanism/processes and modelling of soil degradation, innovation of technology of soil and water conservation, ecological restoration and regional sustainable development.

More information about registration and the submission of abstracts is available on the symposium website http://www.eng.geogr.msu.ru/IYFSWC/

Please, distribute this information to your colleagues and international partners. We are looking forward to meeting you in Moscow in August 2018.

With our best regards,

The Local Organizing Committee
Dr. Sergey Chalov, ICCE Vice-President
prof. Valentin Golosov, ICCE past President

2018 International Hydrology Prize medallists

IAHS are pleased to announce the recipients of the International Hydrology Prize (Dooge medal and Volker medal) for 2018.

The award ceremony will be held on May 8th 2018 at the Global conference 'Prosperity through hydrological services' organized by WMO in Geneva  http://hydroconference.wmo.int/en/conf

The 2018 recipients of the IAHS-UNESCO-WMO International Hydrology Prize are:

Dooge medal - Howard Wheater, at the University of Saskatchewan Canada

Volker medal - Andreas Schumann, at the Ruhr University in Bochum Germany

Nominations for the annual Prize are made by National Committees to IAHS, National Committees to the UNESCO-IHP or National Hydrological Advisors to the WMO, and forwarded to the Secretary General of IAHS for consideration by the Nomination Committee. The Committee consists of the President and a Vice-President of IAHS and representatives of UNESCO and WMO.

As of 2014, two medals are awarded under the International Hydrology Prize: the Dooge medal and the Volker medal. Both medals are intended to distinguish outstanding achievements by hydrological scientists but with a different focus. The Dooge medal is aimed at fundamental contributions to the science of hydrology, whereas the Volker medal is aimed at outstanding applications of hydrological science for the benefit of society at large.

https://iahs.info/About-IAHS/Competition--Events/International-Hydrology-Prize.do  

Our warmest congratulations go to both recipients.

Remote Sensing and Hydrology Symposium abstract submission extended to 7 March

Dear colleagues,

On behalf of the IAHS-International Commission of Remote Sensing, we announce that abstract submission for the Remote Sensing and Hydrology Symposium has been extended to 7 March 2018. The University of Córdoba hosts this edition, devoted to “Earth Observation for Integrated Water and Basin Management: New possibilities and challenges for adaptation to a changing environment”, from 8-10 May 2018 in Córdoba, Spain.

During the conference, we will discuss the state-of-the-art on this topic and current and future needs from remote sensing to provide hydrologists and other related branches of science with data and tools for research on the water cycle components, hydrological modelling, water resource management, and integrated river basin management, among others.

We encourage the international community to participate in this event and contribute to its results and success; young researchers are especially encouraged to join the discussion. All accepted abstracts will be electronically edited by Copernicus; an extended version of a limited number of works will be solicited to the authors upon acceptance of abstracts to be published in a special issue of PIAHS, the proceedings journal of IAHS. Moreover, selected works from the presentations in the conference will be invited to submit a full paper to a special issue of Hydrological Sciences Journal, the official journal of IAHS, indexed in the JCR.

Please, visit our website for further details about registration and submission of abstracts http://rshssymposiumcordoba2018.com  

Different options for accommodation with special fares for the conference attendees are available; we kindly advise to book in advance from our website and technical office to avoid higher prices due to the tourist season in Córdoba.

Please, distribute this information to your colleagues and international partners. We apologize for potential cross-posting. We are looking forward to welcoming you in Córdoba in May 2018.

With our best regards,

The Organizing Committee
Prof. Dr. María J. Polo, University of Córdoba
Dr. María Pat. González-Dugo, IFAPA
Prof. Christopher Neale, University of Nebraska

23 Unsolved Problems in Hydrology - Symposium announcement

Dear All

As you may be aware there is currently a discussion going on with the aim of identifying unsolved scientific problems in hydrology (UPH).

To make tangible progress, the UPH should:

(1) ideally relate to observed phenomena and why they happen;
(2) they should be universal (i.e. not only apply to one catchment or region); and
(3) they should be specific (so there is hope they can be solved).

One example of an UPH is: "Why is root zone storage related to dry spell duration?"

For details see the IAHS YouTube channel:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jyObwmNr7Ko&feature=youtu.be

We welcome any ideas and invite you to contribute to the discussion on the UPH LinkedIn group:  https://www.linkedin.com/groups/13552921

Alternatively, if you prefer not to join LinkedIn, please email one UPH to Günter Blöschl with a brief justification. The UPH will then be included in the compilation to be discussed on 13 and 14 April in Vienna (Meeting Schedule).
 
Below the list of UPH that have been discussed so far on the group.

Best wishes and looking forward to receiving your UPH.

Günter Blöschl
IAHS President

FLOODS AND DROUGHTS

Do we understand scour and erosion processes occurring during extreme floods?
Can we improve the estimation of extreme flood peak discharges?
How can we evaluate the performance of Flood Early Warning Systems, in terms of losses avoided as a result of a warning?
How do we improve drought (or flood) risk assessments?
How to use nature-based solutions to reduce flood risk and drought risks and increase the resilience of water resources?
How do droughts and floods shape hydrological risk awareness?
How are changes in vulnerability influencing trends in flood risk?
How to assess water scarcity by considering both water quantity and quality Do flood rich-poor periods exist? If so why?
Where and when do flood wave superpositions occur and what are the atmospheric, catchment and river network controls on this process?
Water scarcity assessment

SNOW AND ICE

How can we ensure that improved snowmelt models translate into improved capabilities to simulate streamflow from snowy watersheds?
How can small-scale variability of snow distribution be better represented in larger scale models, and what level of detail is needed for snowmelt runoffmodelling?
Under what conditions is snow melt a more efficient generator of streamflow and groundwater recharge than rainfall?
What is the effect of preferential deposition and lateral redistribution of snow on runoff generation in alpineheadwatersheds?
How to determine the snow water equivalent in mountain regions?

WATER QUALITY

Can we devise a combined eco-hydrology index of river health to balance human and ecological needs?
What is the role of water quality in the water-energy-food nexus?
How to describe human-water interactions in water quality models?
How do we identify the dominant process controlling water quality over different spatial scales?
What controls long-term spatio-temporal evolution of catchment water quality?

EVAPORATION AND PRECIPITATION

Soil evaporation and soil evaporation/transpiration partition How plants and grass works and interact with soil and atmosphere to produce evaporation?

SCALE AND SCALING

Will we ever find the best approach to extrapolate point scale data to the catchment scale?
Combining understanding gained at different spatial scales, e.g. generalizing lessons learned from case studies to larger scales.
How dominant hydrological processes emerge and disappear across the scales.
Can we trade space for time in hydrology?

MODELLING (GENERAL)

Can hydrological processes of highly urbanized watershed be realistically simulated/predicted?
What future for process based modelling beyond persistent dilettantism ?
How to solve the energy budget, the carbon budget and the sediment budget together to constrain hydrologic models results?
Which new mathematics to choose for the hydrology of this century?
Does machine learning have a real role in hydrological modelling
How can we really cope hydrological modeling with remote sensing measures ?
When will hydrological models (HMs) be robust enough to anticipate accurately future water conditions?
Is it possible to remove the independence condition in the multivariate frequency analysis (e.g., when using Copulas)?
What is the value of soil moisture observations for hydrologic predictions?
How can we identify the independent factors determining a nonlinearly evolving hydrologic response?
How can one identify the optimal sample dimension to use in multivariate analysis with copula functions?
Assessing the impact of non-stationary (epistemic) precipitation errors on hydrological model predictions

LANDSCAPE PROCESSES AND STREAMFLOW

Why we can not predict river runoff?
Why are the distribution of distances from a point in the catchment to the nearest river reach exponentially distributed?
Why / How does hydro-geomorphology follow thermodynamic laws - Coevolution, structure-function, emergence, anisotropy, scaling...
How can we explain the ubiquitous existence of patterns in hydrology providing constraints on heterogeneity and preferential flow of water through media Natural heterogeneity, thermodynamics and (yet again) closing the waterbalance
What controls the long term water balance, apart from aridity?

MEASUREMENTS AND DATA

Is it possible to accurately measure flow discharge using gauge-cams (or UAV-mounted cameras)?
A large number of inaccurate observations vs a few accurate measurements: what is our best choice?
Working with different data sources (and there varying spatial and temporal resolution), for example impact & vulnerability information, citizen science data, satellite data.
How can we accurately measure water fluxes in the subsurface (soil and groundwater) at a range of scales?
How can we detect and measure spatial hydrological patterns?
How to cost- efficiently observe multiple tracers at a high temporal frequency at various locations?

GROUNDWATER AND SOILS

Can we better account for the complex water flow dynamics in the vadosezone?
What controls the distribution and depth of actively circulating water in the subsurface?
It is time to change our mind to augmenting groundwater recharge by focus on water-bearing formation in uplands watershed not just in flood plains or alluvial fans!
What controls the source of water to wells?
Where and why is the largest global store of freshwater (groundwater) connected to other parts of the hydrologic cycle?
Why transport modeling in the subsurface is often inaccurate and fraught of uncertainty?
What are the main processes controlling transport and transformation of contaminants across scales?
Why assessing groundwater resources and their variation is space and time is a daunting, though dramatically needed, endeavour?
Why removal of contaminant from groundwater by pump-and-treat does not work?
Closing the mass-age balance by measurement

HYDROLOGICAL CHANGE

Why are some catchments more sensitive to land-use/cover change than others?
Is the hydrological cycle regionally accelerating under global warming?
Influence of climate variability on large rivers runoff
Dealing with non-stationarities, e.g differences in timescales between analysis tools & methods, modeling of non-stationary processes
Quantifying the human influence on hydrology and hydrological extremes at the catchment scale What is the real impact of man on the water volumes transferred to the sea by rivers?
Why are springs in mountains drying up?
How can we detect and attribute change in flood characteristics?
Sudden and abrupt changes of water management conditions?
Why do we see long term cycles in temperature, rainfall and river flows?

ASSORTED

Elementary physics of hydrological cycle.
Impact of solar activity on hydrological cycle of the Himalayan and Indian Peninsula Rivers.
Does hydrology needs non-equilibrium thermodynamics or even a new type of thermodynamics ?
How we can do hydrology science more open and replicable?
How can we link our hydrological science with stakeholders?

WMO Global Conference for Prosperity through Hydrological Services

The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) is hosting the Global Conference on "Prosperity through hydrological services" in Geneva, Switzerland, from 7 to 9 May 2018. This conference is organized within the UN decade "Water for Sustainable Development" with IAHS as a partner.

The HydroConference aims to foster collaboration on improving the availability and use of hydrological services worldwide by:

  • Promoting collaboration for new and ongoing initiatives, including the establishment of data exchange;
  • Leveraging the knowledge and expertise of the full range of water stakeholders to coordinate efforts towards greater impact; and 
  • Mobilizing public and private sector leaders to leverage support for key initiatives.

More information about the conference, including the programme, registration and logistical details is available at the conference website: hydroconference.wmo.int

      

Second Reminder - Abstract submission for Remote Sensing and Hydrology Symposium is now open

Dear colleagues,

On behalf of the IAHS-International Commission of Remote Sensing, we announce that abstract submission for the Remote Sensing and Hydrology Symposium is now open until the end of February. The University of Córdoba hosts this edition, devoted to “Earth Observation for Integrated Water and Basin Management: New possibilities and challenges for adaptation to a changing environment”, from 8-10 May 2018 in Córdoba, Spain.

During the conference, we will discuss the state-of-the-art on this topic and current and future needs from remote sensing to provide hydrologists and other related branches of science with data and tools for research on the water cycle components, hydrological modelling, water resource management, and integrated river basin management, among others.

We encourage the international community to participate in this event and contribute to its results and success; young researchers are especially encouraged to join the discussion. All accepted abstracts will be electronically edited by Copernicus; an extended version of a limited number of works will be solicited to the authors upon acceptance of abstracts to be published in a special issue of PIAHS, the proceedings journal of IAHS. Moreover, selected works from the presentations in the conference will be invited to submit a full paper to a special issue of Hydrological Sciences Journal, the official journal of IAHS, indexed in the JCR.

Please, visit our website for further details about registration and submission of abstracts http://rshssymposiumcordoba2018.com 

Different options for accommodation with special fares for the conference attendees are available; we kindly advise to book in advance from our website and technical office to avoid higher prices due to the tourist season in Córdoba.

Please, distribute this information to your colleagues and international partners. We apologize for potential cross-posting. We are looking forward to welcoming you in Córdoba in May 2018.

With our best regards,

The Organizing Committee
Prof. Dr. María J. Polo, University of Córdoba
Dr. María Pat. González-Dugo, IFAPA
Prof. Christopher Neale, University of Nebraska

MOXXI update

In 2013, the International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS) established the Measurements and Observations in the XXI Century (MOXXI) working group with the specific aim to promote the advancement of novel observational techniques toward an improved comprehension of the hydrological cycle. Since then, MOXXI has attracted a vibrant multidisciplinary and international community and has organized special sessions at international conferences (EGU, AGU, and IAHS General Assembly) and focal workshops. A recent currently free-to-view community paper in the Hydrological Sciences Journal (http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02626667.2017.1420191 ) offers a synthesis of MOXXI objectives: a proactive behavior toward observations, multidisciplinarity and contamination from other fields of science, and the use of affordable and opportunistic technologies to enrich our understanding of hydrological processes.

In December 2017, the joint MOXXI – World Meteorological Organization (WMO) HydroHub “Innovation in Hydrometry - From ideas to operation” meeting was held in Geneva at the WMO headquarters. This two-half day workshop brought together members of the science and operations communities to learn about innovative observational methodologies and to foster the uptake of such novel solutions in operational environments. On the first day, around 70 participants from all over the globe attended 28 short presentations followed by Q&A on a variety of topics, including flood gauging, monitoring networks, citizen science, and drone initiatives in hydrology. On the second day, keynote talks, expert interviews, and breakout group discussions motivated the participants to identify key challenges and needs for the uptake of new technologies into hydrological practice. According to a questionnaire administered by WMO after the event, 94% of the surveyed participants deemed both days either good or excellent. We hope that similar events will help open channels of communication and cooperation between the academia and national services for the development of adequate standards and quality management practices. More information on the meeting, including the workshop report and speakers’ presentations, can be find at https://iahs.info/Commissions--W-Groups/Working-Groups/MOXXI/Information/MOXXI-2017.do

Abstract submission for Remote Sensing and Hydrology Symposium is now open

Dear colleagues,

On behalf of the IAHS-International Commission of Remote Sensing, we announce that abstract submission for the Remote Sensing and Hydrology Symposium is now open until the end of February. The University of Córdoba hosts this edition, devoted to “Earth Observation for Integrated Water and Basin Management: New possibilities and challenges for adaptation to a changing environment”, from 8-10 May 2018 in Córdoba, Spain.

During the conference, we will discuss the state-of-the-art on this topic and current and future needs from remote sensing to provide hydrologists and other related branches of science with data and tools for research on the water cycle components, hydrological modelling, water resource management, and integrated river basin management, among others.

We encourage the international community to participate in this event and contribute to its results and success; young researchers are especially encouraged to join the discussion. All accepted abstracts will be electronically edited by Copernicus; an extended version of a limited number of works will be solicited to the authors upon acceptance of abstracts to be published in a special issue of PIAHS, the proceedings journal of IAHS. Moreover, selected works from the presentations in the conference will be invited to submit a full paper to a special issue of Hydrological Sciences Journal, the official journal of IAHS, indexed in the JCR.

Please, visit our website for further details about registration and submission of abstracts http://rshssymposiumcordoba2018.com

Different options for accommodation with special fares for the conference attendees are available; we kindly advise to book in advance from our website and technical office to avoid higher prices due to the tourist season in Córdoba.

Please, distribute this information to your colleagues and international partners. We apologize for potential cross-posting. We are looking forward to welcoming you in Córdoba in May 2018.

With our best regards,

The Organizing Committee
Prof. Dr. María J. Polo, University of Córdoba
Dr. María Pat. González-Dugo, IFAPA
Prof. Christopher Neale, University of Nebraska

Unsolved Problems in Hydrology - help to make a difference

In November 2017 IAHS launched the new initiative to generate the 23 unsolved problems in Hydrology that would revolutionise research in the 21st century with a YouTube video.

The generation of questions is open to everyone and will be distilled through discussion on the IAHS LinkedIn group https://www.linkedin.com/groups/13552921  We aim to finalise the questions in Spring 2018.

We already have entries over a wide range of topics with draft questions and comments. Recent contributions include:

How do droughts and floods shape hydrological risk awareness? By Panta Rhei Working group “Changes in flood risk”

How are changes in vulnerability influencing trends in flood risk? By Panta Rhei Working group “Changes in flood risk”

How to assess water scarcity by considering both water quantity and quality. By  Panta Rhei Working group “Water Scarcity”

Do flood rich-poor periods exist? By Panta Rhei Working Group “Flood Change”

It is time to change our mind to augmenting groundwater recharge by focus on water-bearing formation in uplands watershed not just in flood plains or alluvial fans! By Mohammad Abassi

What controls the source of water to wells? By Kevin Bufus

Where and why is the largest global store of freshwater (groundwater) connected to other parts of the hydrologic cycle? By Tom Gleeson

When will hydrological models (HMs) be robust enough to anticipate accurately future water conditions? By Guillaume Thirel

What is the effect of preferential deposition and lateral redistribution of snow on runoff generation in alpine headwatersheds? By Ulrich Strasser

Assessing the impact of non-stationary (epistemic) precipitation errors on hydrological model predictions. By Keith Beven

There is still time to add your own draft question or add a comment to the existing discussion on the group so please join the conversation.

Subscription for Hydrological Sciences Journal for 2018

The annual subscription is now due for Volume 63 (2018) of Hydrological Sciences Journal. Volume 63 remains at 16 issues but we have managed to keep the annual subscription rate the same. Volume 63 will continue to publish a special series of invited opinion papers directly linked to the IAHS "Panta Rhei" initiative that will be collated in the online virtual special series. Discussions and replies on these opinion papers wll also be published.

In July 2017 we announced the continued rise in Impact Factor for HSJ. The Impact Factor is 2.222 with a 5-Year Impact Factor of 2.372 (©2017 Thomson Reuters, 2016 Journal Citation Reports®).

Following the retirement of Mike Acreman, Attilio Castellarin was confirmed as the Editor-in-Chief at the IAHS Scientific Assembly at Port Elizabeth, South Africa, with Demetris Koutsoyiannis the Outgoing Editor-in-Chief and Ross Woods as the most recent Editor and a new Editor will be appointed in due course. The number of Associate Editors has risen to 41.

Special journal subscription rates are available to IAHS Members: £27.00 for a personal online subscription, and £48.00 for a personal online + print subscription (£32.40 and £53.40, respectively for EU members, inclusive of VAT).

You can renew your membership online via the IAHS website at https://iahs.info/Members-Area/hsj-link.do  or contact the IAHS office via phone +44 1491 692515, fax +44 1491 692448 or email info@iahs.co.uk.

IAHS Membership

Abstract submission deadline for EGU2018 sessions

The abstract submission deadline for EGU2018 sessions is 10th January 2018. The following sessions are especially related to Panta Rhei.


HS1.2 Hydrology, society and environmental change (PICO session)
Conveners: Giuliano Di Baldassarre, Heidi Kreibich, Tobias Krueger, Anne Van Loon

HS2.1.1 Hydrological extremes: from droughts to floods
Conveners: Anne Van Loon, Jan Szolgay, Lena M. Tallaksen, Gregor Laaha

HS5.3 Advances in socio-hydrology
Conveners: Marcus Nüsser, Murugesu Sivapalan, Britta Höllermann, Giuliano Di Baldassarre, Alberto Viglione, Saket Pande

HS5.15/NH1.15 Agent-Based Modelling in hydrology – integrative solutions to the Food Water Energy nexus (co-organized)
Conveners: Ted Veldkamp, Jeroen Aerts, Giuliano Di Baldassarre, Niko Wanders

HS7.4 Naturally trendy: natural (and non-natural) trends (and non-trends) in climate and hydrology
Conveners: Serena Ceola, Demetris Koutsoyiannis, Alberto Montanari, C. Cudennec, Harry Lins

NH9.13/HS11.45/SSS13.67 Including Socio-Economic Dynamics and Feedbacks in Risk Assessment Models (co-organized)
Conveners: Jeroen Aerts, Giuliano Di Baldassarre, Sven Fuchs, S. Surminski

HS2.4.3/NH1.25 River flood dynamics and risk: processes, controls, consequences (co-organized)
Conveners: Sergiy Vorogushyn, William Farmer, Heidi Kreibich, Luis Mediero, Alberto Viglione

HS5.7/ERE3.8 Advances in modeling and control of environmental systems: from drainage and irrigation to hybrid energy generation. (co-organized)
Conveners: Alla Kolechkina, Matteo Giuliani , Jonathan Herman , Andreas Efstratiadis , Mashor Housh , Eric Duviella

HS5.1 Hydrology & Society: Transdisciplinary approaches to hydrology and water resources management PICO session
Conveners: Leon Herman, Britta Höllermann , Thomas Thaler , Gemma Carr , Eric Lindquist

Panta Rhei Survey

Dear Colleagues,

This is a reminder about the ongoing Panta Rhei Survey.

You can help us identify hotspots of water crises around the world by filling in the attached questionnaire before January 8. It takes only 5-10 minutes!

This Panta Rhei Survey is a step towards a community-wide effort to share data and advance our understanding of social, technical and hydrological factors underlying the emergence of different phenomena.

If you know of any water crisis, please fill in the questionnaire (see attachment) and send it back by email to giuliano.dibaldassarre@geo.uu.se by January 8. All contributions will be properly acknowledged.

Best wishes,

Giuliano Di Baldassarre
IAHS Panta Rhei Chair 2017-2019

On behalf of the IAHS Panta Rhei Leadership Team (Veena Srinivasan, Fuqiang Tian, Yasir Mohamed, Tobias Krueger, Heidi Kreibich, Junguo Liu, Tara J. Troy & Amir AghaKouchak)