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HSJ Digest: latest articles and updates

 

     

Hot off the press - latest HSJ articles and updates 

Hydrological Sciences Journal is the official Journal of IAHS and provides a forum for original papers and for the exchange of information and views on significant developments in hydrology worldwide. It is published by Taylor & Francis and is available online and in print format. Keep abreast of our latest issues here, together with the Co-editors’ choice of featured articles.

 

Co-editors' choice

Issue 1 Featured article – free to view for six months

"Post-fire hydrologic analysis: A tale of two severities" suggests that a “tactical pause” is required to re-evaluate the concepts of fire/burn severity, with important implications for fire management and post-fire hydrological modelling. The paper highlights the importance of distinguishing between vegetation burn severity and soil burn severity when assessing post-fire hydrologic impacts, highlighting the need for a more nuanced approach. It also discusses the potential synergistic future of remote sensing with in-situ severity metrics, suggesting that combining these data sources could lead to more accurate and reliable predictions. We look forward to initiating a broader discussion on post-fire hydrologic analysis. Your discussion and research papers are welcome! The paper is free to view for six months.

Kendra Fallon et al. (2023) “Post-fire hydrologic analysis: a tale of two severities”, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 69:01, 139–148; DOI: 10.1080/02626667.2023.2284306

 

Co-editors' choice

Issue 2 Featured article - imminently free to view for six months

A key new HSJ review paper.
We are delighted to feature the publication of a particularly innovative and somewhat controversial HSJ paper by former Editor-in-Chief Demetris Koutsoyiannis and Christos Vournas. The article, titled “Revisiting the greenhouse effect—a hydrological perspective”, is written in Demetris Koutsoyiannis's signature style, combining humour with a hydrological perspective on a topical issue. The study challenges conventional thinking on the greenhouse effect and offers a new perspective that is sure to stimulate scientific discussion: old formulae for calculating the greenhouse effect are still accurate, the authors claim, even with more carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. 
Demetris Koutsoyiannis and Christos Vournas (2023) “Revisiting the greenhouse effect—a hydrological perspective”, Hydrological Sciences Journal; 69:02, 151-164; DOI: 10.1080/02626667.2023.2287047

 

Hydrological Sciences Journal, Volume 69, Issue 1 (2024)

Special issue: Informative data in hydrology

Article: Which range of streamflow data is most informative in the calibration of an hourly hydrological model? 
By Mohamed Saadi & Carina Furusho-Percot. Pages: 1-20 | DOI: 10.1080/02626667.2023.2277835.

Article: Vulnerability assessment for climate adaptation planning in a Mediterranean basin.
By M. Alba Solans, Hector Macian-Sorribes, Francisco Martínez-Capel & Manuel Pulido-Velazquez. Pages: 21-45 | DOI: 10.1080/02626667.2023.2219397.

Research Articles

Research Article: Spatiotemporal changes in snow cover and their relationship with drought events in the Lake Urmia basin.
By Hadi Safari, Majid Montaseri & Somayeh Hejabi. Pages: 46-62 | DOI: 10.1080/02626667.2023.2276737.

Research Article: Landscape patterns and quantified attribution to runoff changes based on the Budyko framework in Nanning, China.
By Jiaoyin Wei, Yunchuan Yang, Junpei Wei, Liping Liao, Qianyun Li, Haixiang Liao, Miaoqing Liu, Shanqi Huang, Chongxun Mo, Guikai Sun & Xungui Li. Pages: 63-78 | DOI: 10.1080/02626667.2023.2277837.

Research Article: Comparing three machine learning algorithms with existing methods for natural streamflow estimation.
By Shahriar Mehrvand, Marie-Amélie Boucher, Kurt Kornelsen & Alireza Amani. Pages: 79-94 | DOI: 10.1080/02626667.2023.2273402.

Research Article: A coupled model applied to complex river–lake systems.
By Qi Zhang, Chesheng Zhan, Yueling Wang, Haoyue Zhang & Zhonghui Lin. Pages: 95-105 | DOI: 10.1080/02626667.2023.2285441.

Research Article: Differentiation of Sahelian aquifers from chemical and isotopic composition using linear statistics and machine learning.
By Abdoul-Azize Barry, Suzanne Yameogo, Meryem Touzani, Samuel Nakolendoussé, Meryem Jabrane, Abdessamad Touiouine, Ismail Mohsine, Laurent Barbiero & Vincent Valles. Pages: 106-119 | DOI: 10.1080/02626667.2023.2288209.

Reviews

Review Article: Waves of change: a preliminary literature review of non-drinkable water and environmental justice research.
By Katherine Canfield, Adrian Cato, Kathleen Torso & Kate Mulvaney. Pages: 120-138 | DOI: 10.1080/02626667.2023.2280679.

Review Article: Post-fire hydrologic analysis: a tale of two severities.
By Kendra Fallon, Shawn J. Wheelock, Mojtaba Sadegh, Jennifer L. Pierce, James P. McNamara, Megan Cattau & Victor R. Baker. Pages: 139-148 | DOI: 10.1080/02626667.2023.2284306.

 

Hydrological Sciences Journal, Volume 69, Issue 2 (2024)

Research articles

Revisiting the greenhouse effect – a hydrological perspective
Demetris Koutsoyiannis & Christos Vournas
Pages 151-164 | DOI: 10.1080/02626667.2023.2287047

Evaluation of climate-change impacts on the temporal and spatial behaviour of drought in South-Central Chile
Andrea Bobadilla, Alejandra Stehr & Nicolás Toro
Pages 165-184 | DOI: 10.1080/02626667.2023.2288217

Soil moisture–temperature coupling over India through multi-scale observations
Amal Joy & K Satheesan
Pages 185-194 | DOI: 10.1080/02626667.2023.2293749

Solar radiation transfer in an ice-covered lake at different snow thicknesses
Wen Zhao, Wenfeng Huang, Rui Li, Jinrong Zhang, Cheng Zhang, Zhijun Li & Zhanju Lin
Pages 195- 206 | DOI: 10.1080/02626667.2023.2297075

A new strategy for prediction of water qualitative and quantitative parameters by deep learning-based models with determination of modelling uncertainties
Mojtaba Poursaeid & Amir Hossein Poursaeed
Pages 207-225 | DOI: 10.1080/02626667.2023.2293755

A novel coupled algorithm-based method, and the characteristics and driving mechanism of water shortage in the upper Yellow River
Meiqing Yang, Yi Tian, Xungui Li, Yining Wei, Fuwan Gan, Yunchuan Yang & Shaobo Wang
Pages 226-240 | DOI: 10.1080/02626667.2023.2297825

Flood process types and runoff coefficient variability in climatic regions of Iran
Afshin Jahanshahi & Martijn J. Booij
Pages 241-258 | DOI: 10.1080/02626667.2024.2302420

Technical Note 

Gauging the ungauged: estimating rainfall in a West African urbanized river basin using ground-based and spaceborne sensors 
Linda Bogerd, Rose B. Pinto, Hidde Leijnse, Jan Fokke Meirink, Tim H.M. van Emmerik & Remko Uijlenhoet
Pages 259-273 | DOI: 10.1080/02626667.2023.2284871

 

2nd call for papers: ICCE symposium on the "Sensitivity of erosion and sediment transport to recent climate change"

Dear colleagues,

This is the 2nd call for papers for the symposium of the IAHS International Commission on Continental Erosion (ICCE) that we’re proud to host at the Catholic University of Eichstätt-Ingolstadt, Germany, on July 24th-26th, 2024. The submission deadline (March 3rd) is fast approaching; while it may be that this deadline will be extended, the deadline for the hotel rooms we have pre-reserved for conference participants (see conference website) cannot be postponed as the meeting will take place during the main summer holiday period in Germany. It is therefore recommended to consider registering before the initial deadline passes.

As the anthropogenic alteration of global climate and its specific regional features become more and more evident, the symposium aims to shed light on recent progress and research avenues regarding the sensitivity of erosion and sediment transport to recent climatic and environmental changes. This topic spans multiple compartments of geosystems such as:

  • processes on hillslopes and slope stability
  • fluvial processes, river planform changes and sediment budgets
  • aeolian sediment dynamics

Consequently, we’re open for contributions related to different environments of the Earth and hope to stimulate discussion and collaboration. As many of the aforementioned processes affect human life, societies and economy, we are interested in both basic and applied research. Your presentation might also show methodological innovations leading to better measurements and understanding of erosion and sediment transport in the past, present and future.

The venue is located in central Bavaria, between Munich and Nuremberg (airports) and can be reached by national and international train connections. Please visit our conference website https://www.ku.de/icce2024, get informed, and consider registering for this international yet familiar event !

Early-career colleagues from disadvantaged countries are eligible for applying for a Sivapalan Young Scientist Award (SYSTA) travel grant for which the deadline is February 16th, 2024. More information regarding funding support will be posted on the registration website.

Looking forward to meeting you !

On behalf of the organisers and ICCE officers,

Tobias Heckmann
Dept. of Physical Geography
Catholic University of Eichstaett-Ingolstadt

 

Join the HELPING session in Roorkee, India

Call for Registration to participate in the special session organised by the IAHS during the Roorkee Water Conclave 2024 (3-6 March 2024) at IIT Roorkee.

Special Session and Organisers

The special session organised by the IAHS during the Roorkee Water Conclave 2024 (3-6 March 2024) at IIT Roorkee to feature the IAHS HELPING Decade: Science for Solutions held on 3 March 2024, and will be organised by Archana Sarkar, Berit Arheimer, Jean-Marie Kileshye Onema, Ankit Agarwal, Jew Das.

Registration and Audience

Please click here to submit your interest in attending Special Sessions held during the Roorkee Water Conclave 3-6 March 2024. The target audience would include students, researchers, NGOs, scientists, academicians, policy makers, and working professionals. More information regarding the Roorkee Water Conclave 2024 is available here.

Session Scope

We welcome presentations describing contemporary hydrological research efforts, which aim to solve fundamental water-related environmental and societal problems by engaging with other disciplines and local stakeholders.

The increasing demand for water due to population growth and globalization, coupled with the impact of climate change, has made water security a global issue that affects the economic, social, and environmental sustainability of many regions and communities. In order to ensure safe water supply for human and environment, and protecting them from water hazards in the present circumstances, hydrological knowledge is needed more than ever. However, scientific knowledge on resilience and water security is fragmented in discipline, people, and place. There is a substantial lack of synthesis and easily digestible scientific messages among hydrologists, across disciplines and from scientists to practitioners, decision-makers and the general public. Hence, there is a need for the hydrological research community to take the lead and better link local hydrological research with global patterns of the water cycle, and further, to provide science-based water-centric decision support for local sustainable water management.

Therefore, the IAHS is dedicating the next scientific decade to science for solutions. The name HELPING, stands for Hydrology Engaging Local People IN one Global world and aims to identify local water problems in holistic/system analyses, search for solutions, be bold and push boundaries to make an impact. The vision is to solve fundamental water-related environmental and societal problems by engaging with other disciplines and local stakeholders. This special session will focus on the 3 Themes of HELPING, which all aim to understand hydrological diversity and integrate knowledge across scales and regions to achieve sustainable water management in coherence with the local context;

Theme 1: HELPING with global and local interactions using systems analysis, to develop enhanced understanding of the global water crisis but from a local lens.
Theme 2: HELPING with holistic solutions to the water crisis, embracing nature-based measures, participatory management and nexus analysis including other disciplines and multiple stakeholders.
Theme 3: HELPING with cross-cutting approaches to facilitate the above goals, including science communication, integrating new technologies, and fostering local co-creation processes.

The New Science For Solutions Decade HELPING

IAHS has proudly and successfully coordinated two Scientific Decades, which, amongst other things, set the research agenda worldwide through collaborative forces. The overall aim with a scientific decade is to accumulate knowledge and streamline the efforts so that coherent engagement, sharing and focus accelerate scientific knowledge and understanding of a specific hydrological problem or phenomena. It stimulates vivid discussions between young and senior scientists globally. The third Scientific Decade 2023–2032 of IAHS launches a topic for collaborative efforts in hydrological sciences: HELPING, created through a participatory community process and by applying strategic planning. The this Scientific Decade is dedicated to local solutions under the global water crisis. The name HELPING, stands for Hydrology Engaging Local People IN one Global world. This decade is a bottom-up process empowered by local hydrologists and scientists using open science and local data/methods when solving local water problems. We envisage that the building of local knowledge and cooperation will inform scientists working under similar situations or facing unexpected events worldwide.

The spirit of HELPING collaboration and innovation is in full swing and we are excited to share that our global community is coming together to make a meaningful impact to understand and handle the water crisis of the Anthropocene. The journey ahead for the HELPING Working Groups promises excitement, growth, and an opportunity to make a meaningful impact. Currently there are 26 Working Groups attracting from 8 up to 136 people in each (median value is 56 participants). We invite all of you to be part of this incredible adventure. You can join an existing Working Group and contribute to the collective efforts. Together, we will redefine what's achievable and set new standards for success. With joint efforts we can make a difference as a community, and we're excited to have you on board.

Join The HELPING Decade

If you're new to the world of HELPING and eager to get involved, don't hesitate to reach out to us. Our team is not only passionate about our mission but also excited to provide you with all the information you need. A detailed list of HELPING Working Groups is already available, complete with proposal documents and contact information for the Theme Leaders as well as each Working Group leader. If you find a group that aligns with your research interests, reach out to the leader directly. Alternatively, you can email us at [email protected]. Your journey toward scientific collaboration and discovery begins here! Let's unite, innovate, and make a lasting impact together during the HELPING Decade!

HSJ Calls for Manuscript Submissions

The Hydrological Sciences Journal is calling for manuscript submissions to one of several Special Issues.

Karst hydrology: characterization and modelling of flow and transport processes in complex karst systems

Karst hydrology represents a continuously evolving field of research with the scientific community. The unique characteristics of karst systems, in particular the multiple phases involved in flow and transport processes, the various interactions with the land surface, and their heterogeneity at the origin of numerous uncertainties, generate hydrological behaviours that are significantly different from other natural hydrological and hydrogeological systems on earth. Given these peculiarities of karst systems, the community working on karst hydrological phenomena brings together researchers from multiple disciplines, such as hydrologists, hydrogeologists, geologists, mathematicians, physicists and many more. While considerable advances have been made over recent decades to better understand, characterize and forecast the hydrological functioning of karst systems, no attempt has been made to collect these contributions in one journal special issue. Submit an article or manuscript here.

Emerging hydro-climatic dynamics and human–water interactions in a changing world: perspectives from Roorkee Water Conclave 2024

Unravelling spatiotemporal patterns and interactions among climate variables, especially those related to hydroclimate, has always been an important task for geoscientists in general, and for hydro-climatologists in particular, mostly because it contributes significantly to better prediction and forecasting. However, complexities are intrinsic to natural systems, and for this reason the task of identifying patterns and interactions has always been challenging. Coupled with the existing challenges of global warming-induced climate change and human influence, these patterns and interactions become further unusual, unexpected and unpredictable. For instance, the influence of anthropogenic activities on the global water cycle has been significant and has been a major factor in changes in the global water balance. Research findings show that humans are responsible for more than half (57%) of seasonal surface water storage fluctuations. The United States Geological Survey (USGS) recently released a new water cycle diagram, showing humans as part of the hydrological cycle. This Special Issue is expected to advance our understanding of these emerging hydro-climatic patterns, teleconnections, extreme events and human influence in a changing world for more accurate prediction or projection of their changes, especially on different spatial–time scales. Submit an article or manuscript here.

Twenty-first century hydrological challenges and opportunities in Africa.

Africa is endowed with vast surface water and groundwater resources. However, several issues, including climate change, population growth, land use and land cover change, have presented numerous hydrological challenges with consequences for livelihoods, socio-economic development and the environment. There is strong evidence that changes in the hydrological cycle have occurred and will continue to do so in the future. The impacts of these include altered precipitation patterns, rising temperatures and multiplication of extreme weather events, thereby increasing water scarcity, pollution of water resources and uneven distribution of water availability. These changes have profound implications for water supply, agriculture, ecosystems and public health, necessitating a deeper understanding of Africa's hydrological systems. The Twenty-first century hydrological challenges and opportunities in Africa Special Issue offers a platform for experts in hydrology, hydrogeology, climate science, water resources governance and related fields to share their expertise and latest discoveries on the topic across the African continent. This Africa Special Issue is not only an opportunity to highlight pressing challenges but also a platform to showcase innovative solutions and success stories from the African continent. With this Special Issue, we aim to inspire collaborative efforts and promote the exchange of ideas, knowledge and best practice among the African regions and wider global hydrological community. Submit an article or manuscript here.

Everybody in HELPING

To all who have signed up to HELPING Working Groups

Please note that IAHS is organising 3 events at large international conferences in 2024! They are as follows:

The call for abstracts to EGU is 10 January 2024! You will find our Session HS1.3.1 HERE so please submit an abstract indicating your relevant work for the New Science for Solutions Decade. It will be a great opportunity for many of us to meet in person and discuss the way forward.

If you're curious about the HELPING Working Groups and want to learn more, don't hesitate to get in touch with us. Our team is passionate about what we do, and we'd love to share the details with you. Just drop us an email at [email protected], and let's embark on this scientific journey together. Your quest for knowledge starts here! 

See you there!

Phishing or suspicious emails or texts claiming to be from IAHS

It has come to our attention that there are bogus emails circulating claiming to be from the IAHS President. Please do not engage with an unexpected request for help.

Have you received an email or text (SMS) requesting financial assistance or personal help for an IAHS officer? Is someone asking about your IAHS account, email, phone number, password, or payment method? If so, it probably did not come from us.

We will never ask you to enter your personal information in a text or email. This includes:

Credit or debit card numbers
Bank account details
IAHS passwords.


Please, ignore emails and texts that are not specific or expected. If the email or text links to an URL that you don't recognise, do not tap or click it. If you did already, do not enter any information on the website that opened.

Scammers can’t get information from you unless you give it to them. So don’t click any links in the messages or reply to them.

Please forward any suspicious emails to [email protected] so that we can report the phishing attack to the British police.

HSJ volume 69 personal subscriptions now due

HYDROLOGICAL SCIENCES JOURNAL 
Editor in Chief: Attilio Castellarin
Co-Editors: Stacey Archfield, Aldo Fiori, Konstantinos Soulis, and Riddhi Singh.

Hydrological Sciences Journal provides a forum for original papers and discussion of significant developments in hydrological science and practice, and related disciplines.

The Impact Factor of HSJ is 3.5 (©2023 Clarivate Analytics, 2022 Journal Citation Reports®) with a 5-year Impact Factor of 3.7.

Institutions and libraries should order direct from Taylor & Francis or their usual agent.

Special journal subscription rates are available to IAHS Members: £27.00 for a personal online subscription, and £48.00 for a personal online + print subscription.  IAHS Members should order by contacting [email protected]  

Access to the back archive is free - explore 66 volumes of cutting-edge research and discovery.

IAHS members from the following countries are eligible for 80% discount on book prices, subject to the minimum price restriction, and free online access to HSJ via the IAHS website members area:

Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cabo Verde, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, East Timor, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kiribati, Kosovo, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Macedonia, Republic of, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Micronesia, Moldova, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Palestine, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Rwanda, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Swaziland, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Thailand, Togo, Tonga, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Vietnam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

List of eligible countries with GDP per capita smaller than the median of all countries of the world (UN data, 2020)

N.B. This list is subject to revision.

A Year of Achievements

I hope this message finds you well as we approach the end of another remarkable year. It's been a journey filled with hard work, dedication, and significant accomplishments. As we prepare to bid farewell to 2023 and embrace the opportunities of the year ahead, let's take a moment to reflect on some of the remarkable successes we've achieved together.

HELPING: We embarked on a new scientific journey with the launch of the HELPING scientific decade, setting the stage for groundbreaking research and innovation.

Digital Water Globe Launch: Our commitment to embracing technological advancements was evident with the launch of the Digital Water Globe (DWG). The DWG is an innovative tool specially designed for, and by, IAHS members where you can give visibility to (un)published results, research sites and find peers for collaborating around the world. This innovative tool is set to revolutionize how we analyse and understand water systems, setting new standards for research and exploration.

New IAHS Website: Our digital presence received a major boost with the introduction of our new IAHS website, providing a user-friendly platform for our members.

UN 2023 Water Conference: IAHS was proudly represented at the UN 2023 Water Conference, thanks to the dedicated efforts of Berit Arheimer, Christophe Cudennec, and Salvatore Grimaldi.

IUGG General Assembly: We had the privilege of participating in the IUGG General Assembly, where we had the opportunity to exchange knowledge and collaborate with esteemed colleagues from around the world. Our members actively participated, contributing their expertise and insights to foster collaboration and innovation in the field.

2023 IAHS Officer Elections: We conducted successful officer elections during the IAHS Administrative Plenary in July, ensuring the leadership of our organization remains in capable hands.

Panta Rhei Symposium: The Panta Rhei Symposium was a resounding success, marking the closure of the Panta Rhei – Change in Hydrology and Society scientific decade. Your contributions made it a memorable event.

International Commission on Human-Water Feedbacks (ICHWF): The establishment of a new International Commission was a significant step forward, capitalizing on the momentum generated during the Panta Rhei Symposium.

IC Workshops: I am thrilled to share that this year has been a resounding success for our International Commissions’ workshops. We set out with a vision, and through our collective hard work, dedication, and passion, we have not only met but exceeded our goals. From innovative product development to fostering collaboration across borders, our workshops have been instrumental in pushing the boundaries of what's possible.

This year has been nothing short of extraordinary for IAHS, and it's all thanks to your unwavering commitment. The IAHS office is closed and will reopen on Tuesday 2nd January 2024. Looking ahead, 2024 promises new challenges and opportunities. I am confident that, with your enthusiasm and expertise, we will achieve even greater heights.

As we bid farewell to 2023 and look forward to the opportunities that await us in the coming year, I want to convey a simple yet profound message to each and every one of you. Your passion, expertise, and collaborative spirit are the driving forces behind our success.

Warm regards

 

Jean-Marie Kileshye Onema 
IAHS Secretary General

Full speed ahead for HELPING Working Groups

The spirit of HELPING collaboration and innovation is in full swing and we are excited to share the milestones from the first year of the decade, where our global community is coming together to make a meaningful impact to understand and handle the water crisis of the Anthropocene.

The journey ahead for the HELPING Working Groups promises excitement, growth, and an opportunity to make a meaningful impact. Currently there are 26 Working Groups attracting from 8 up to 136 people in each (median value is 56 participants). We invite all of you to be part of this incredible adventure. You can join an existing Working Group and contribute to the collective efforts. Together, we will redefine what's achievable and set new standards for success. Stay tuned for updates, announcements, and upcoming events. With joint efforts we can make a difference as a community, and we're excited to have you on board.

Fostering Connections and Synergies

In the spirit of inclusivity and knowledge exchange, two webinars were held on November 2023. The first of which was held on 2nd November, in which 220 people participated. And the second webinar was held on 9th November in which 125 people participated. These sessions brought Working Group leaders together to present their ideas and engage with participants who've signed up. Additionally, breakout discussions allowed Working Groups to dive into their tasks and explore potential collaborations. Some Working Groups decided to merge, and others found new homes within different themes, strengthening our connections and synergy. You are invited to view the presentations from each Working Group here.

Webinar 2nd November 2023

Webinar 9th November 2023

Unveiling the HELPING Emblem of Unity

In an open call that ignited creativity worldwide, we invited the community to craft an emblem that would symbolise our shared commitment to HELPING. A remarkable total of 14 inspiring logos were submitted for consideration. The moment of decision arrived during the IUGG/IAHS General Assembly in Berlin in July 2023 when attendees raised their hands to cast their votes.

The winning design, masterfully created by Judith Boekee from Delft University of Technology, features a globe cradled by hands from across the planet. It's a powerful representation of our global unity and mutual assistance. The red shape within the emblem is a nod to the IAHS logo, reinforcing our connection.

A Journey Documented: HELPING Community Paper

We're excited to announce that a comprehensive community paper documenting the ideas and initialisation of the HELPING decade in progress. This paper will be submitted to the IAHS community journal Hydrological Sciences Journal (HSJ) early next year. Stay tuned for more updates on this significant milestone here.

Time plan for HELPING

10 December 2022 - 20 January 2023: online forum for suggesting topics
1 - 3 February: workshop in Córdoba, Spain + parallel online meetings (view the Outcomes Document here)
20 February - 1 March: survey on members engagement
15 March: first draft of the Concept Note 
16 March - 28 April: online forum open for suggestion Actions for the new decade
27 April: 1 or 2 Splinter meetings at EGU in Vienna, Austria
29 April: 1 day workshop in Vienna, Austria Flyer Outcomes Document
15 May - 30 June: open call for Working Groups and proposal for the new graphical logo of the decade
8 July: suggested Working Groups on the IAHS website with the possibility to sign up
14 July: launch of the new Scientific decade at the IUGG General Assembly in Berlin
     18:30 hrs open discussion on Working Groups at IUGG General Assembly in Berlin
     19:15 hrs voting for the winner of the graphical logo competition at IUGG General Assembly in Berlin
     Opening the call again for new Working Groups
15 July-15 September: open the call for more Working Groups again
15 September: possibility to sign-up to Working Groups until end September
15 September - 15 October: open call for self-nominations to become Theme leader(s) of first 2 years
early November: open online workshop of consolidated Working Groups
15 November: new descriptions of Working Groups and workplans
1st week of December: decision by Bureau of the strategic plan and HELPING setup
15 December: manuscript of Community Paper to HSJ.

New to HELPING?

If you're new to the world of HELPING and eager to get involved, don't hesitate to reach out to us. Our team is not only passionate about our mission but also excited to provide you with all the information you need. A detailed list of HELPING Working Groups is already available, complete with proposal documents and contact information for the Theme Leaders as well as each Working Group leader. If you find a group that aligns with your research interests, reach out to the leader directly. Alternatively, you can email us at [email protected]. Your journey toward scientific collaboration and discovery begins here!

Let's unite, innovate, and make a lasting impact together during the HELPING Decade!

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